The Wild Part 1: God is BIG.

20150309_114224Two weeks ago, I was waning.

I was worn out from classes and work, attempting to please people, control my future and create my own peace. I needed spiritual and physical rest.

So God sent me into the wild.

Last week, I backpacked in Utah’s Escalante National Monument with 10 other campers and guides.

We hiked about 6-10 miles each day, up and down canyons, through brush and thorns, on rock and sand.

We delved into deep valleys, soaked our socks in muddy, freezing water. We trekked up steep mountains, drenched in sweat and pining for water.

With every step, God spoke loudly through His silent creation.

God is big.

He created the twinkling sky, overpowering mountains and billowing plains.

He created the entire universe: dark and light, waters and land, plants and animals, in just six days.

His creativity is big. His handiwork is big. Everything He does is big.

God is big, but works in small ways.

He didn’t strike me with lightning or speak through a mountain lion–which was a definite possibility.

He didn’t shout with a booming voice from the clouds while I stood on top of a peak.

He whispered on the wind, “I love you. I made this for you.” And that was enough for me.

God is big, but works in small ways, and through small people.

He doesn’t only choose world leaders and presidents, He isn’t exclusive to pick celebrities or mega church pastors.

He calls the kindergartener on the playground, the teen mom at home, the college undergrad at Baylor University.

He seeks out the man with terminal cancer crying for a cure, the homeless woman begging for breakfast, the orphan praying for a family.

The bigness of God is not a small matter.

With an invisible God, it can be easy to forget His absolute magnitude, power and strength.

In the wild, all I could see was His absolute magnitude, power and strength.

I felt small. I looked small. I am small.

God’s creativity and artwork are mountains bigger than me, but He magnifies the small skills, passion, faith and trust I bring.

He is big enough to use a small, weak, pathetic little girl like me to glorify Him.

If that isn’t a big deal, I don’t know what is.

Categories: College Life, Everything Else, Life Written., Love Languages, Sojourn.Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Maelyn Schramm

Adopted from China, I hail from Dallas and spent a few years studying in Waco at Baylor University. As a recent college graduate, I'm learning how to be an adult by taking risks, living boldly and faithfully following The Lord. I love coffee, puppies and adventures.

2 Comments

  1. Great stuff, what part of the monument did you hike? This is an experience common to the grand-staircase. It is recognized as one of the furthest places you can get from civilization–and to me, that means it’s one of the places you can get closest to God. It’s so quiet and peaceful. I had a similar experience to yours with this area several years ago, at a ranch called Turn-About Ranch. I felt the great power of God to influence just a small person like me. I wrote about it here, if you care to take a read:
    http://www.cairnandcottonwood.com/spirituality/turn-about-ranch-a-tale-of-unnexpected-recovery/

    Because of this experience, I now live in Escalante for the purpose of coming closer to God. I’m amazed everyday at the beauty of the Grand-Staircase and the power of God.

    Thanks for sharing this, Maelyn!

    • Thank you for sharing your experience. Escalante is a special place that is easy to fall in love with. We hiked through and around Death Hollow, I’m not exactly sure the routes we took. I’d have to agree, the seclusion of Escalante is what brought me so close to God that week. It’s easier to hear and feel Him without the distractions of a hustling, bustling college campus.
      Honestly, returning to Waco was difficult for me. Cameron Park pales in comparison to the canyons and mountains of Escalante.

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